Tag Archives: bristlecone

Underwater in the Sierra Nevadas

While we’re re-visiting bristlecones and foxtails, the Here are three interesting online articles, each of which discusses areas in the Sierra Nevada CA, which are now submerged, but where forests grew in the Medieval Warm Period. Many readers of this blog will have read articles about trees being disgorged from receding glaciers and it’s hard […]

Juckes and the Pea under the Thimble (#1)

Juckes has much to say about several MM articles, none of it favorable and little of it accurate. Juckes, like the rest of the Team, seldom quotes our articles – instead, he typically paraphrases what we said, often creating a straw man, which he prefers to deal with. It’s a wearisome task disentangling the many […]

Juckes and the NOAMER PC1

Subsequent to MM05 (GRL), the issue of covariance and correlation PCs as applied to the North American tree ring network was considered in Huybers [2005], our Reply to Huybers [2005] and the NAS Panel. It was also discussed in the rejected Ammann and Wahl submission to GRL. Juckes did not even cite the discussion on […]

Bristlecones, Foxtails and Temperature

The relationship of bristlecone/foxtails to gridcell temperature is something that I’ve discussed at length, but, surprisingly, I’ve never illustrated it at the blog. This is a type of relationship that, in some ways, is well suited to blogs. It’s simple to discuss; it’s important. It would be amply illustrated and discussed in business feasibility studies […]

Rocky Mountain High #2

Pat Frank thought that I was being a little sarcastic of the rigors of updating tree ring collections at Niwot Ridge. However, I’d like now to give what is perhaps a better example of what Mann had in mind when he explained the inability of paleoclimatologists to update tree ring collections. Just to review, here’s […]

A New Spaghetti Graph

Von Storch and Mann have both said that, in an MBH98-type reconstruction, it is impossible to allocate the impact of individual proxies. This is incorrect as we pointed out in MM05b. My posts on MBH98 Linear Algebra showed this more clearly (or at least in more detail). However, those posts only took the analysis back […]

Graybill and Funkhouser [1993] on Bristlecones

I have recently located a copy of Graybill and Funkhouser [1993], Dendroclimatic Reconstructions during the past millennium in the southern Sierra Nevada and Owens Valley, California, which has been very hard to find. This appears to be Graybill’s last publication before he died. A detailed excerpt follows. Some key quotes: Unfortunately the chronologies from the […]

Lamarche on Treelines #2

Here is Lamarche’s diagram of altitudes at the key bristlecone sites of Sheep Mountain and Campito Mountain (as noted below, when wood erosion is allosed for, the post-MWP decline is placed after 1500.)

Lamarche [1973] on Treelines #1

Valmore Lamarche was perhaps the first person to suggest that temperature information could be extracted from bristlecone pine information and his early publications are often referenced. Lamarche et al. [1984] (with Fritts, Graybill and Rose) first postulated CO2 fertilization. As you know, I’m increasingly interested in changes in treeline elevation as a "low-frequency proxy". It […]

Bunn et al. [2005] – 20th century tree growth in the Sierra Nevadas

Bunn et al. [2005] have an interesting discussion of 20th century tree growth (especially foxtail pines) in the Sierra Nevada and White Mountains, in the current Holocene, which, needless to say, was interesting to me. The extraordinary and uncritical embedding of MBH98-99 in paleoclimate mentality recurs here in a curious way. Roger Pielke wondered whether […]

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 3,254 other followers