Tag Archives: bristlecone

IPCC AR4 and the Return of Chucky – He’s Baaack!

Here’s something I meant to post up when AR4 came out. I was reminded of this when Rob Wilson posted recently: Lastly, lets not forget that TR based reconstructions of NH temperatures exist that do not use Bristlecone pine or Foxtail data. Rob’s point here is very disingenuous (to use Mann-speak) since millennial reconstructions are […]

The Ababneh Thesis

As I mentioned yesterday, Malcolm Hughes and/or the University of Arizona Laboratory for Tree-Ring Research had gone to the trouble of blocking my IP address from accessing their website. Thanks to the help of a couple of CA readers, I was able to circumvent the block. This is the sort of petty behavior that gives […]

Salzer and Hughes on Bristlecones

A reader writes in: I think Steve and the other CA readers will be interested in the new article by Matthew Salzer and Malcolm Hughes (of MBH fame) entitled “Bristlecone pine tree rings and volcanic eruptions over the last 5000 yr” in the latest issue of Quaternary Research, “> available for free. I don’t have […]

Underwater in the Sierra Nevadas

While we’re re-visiting bristlecones and foxtails, the Here are three interesting online articles, each of which discusses areas in the Sierra Nevada CA, which are now submerged, but where forests grew in the Medieval Warm Period. Many readers of this blog will have read articles about trees being disgorged from receding glaciers and it’s hard […]

Bristlecones and Sagebrush

In MM05 (EE), we reviewed literature on bristlecones because these trees were supposed to be unique radio receivers for world temperature. Obviously the specialist literature stood against this proposition. We cited a number of interesting articles by Mooney in American Midland Naturalist in the 1960s – none of which are considered by Juckes in his […]

Juckes and the Pea under the Thimble (#1)

Juckes has much to say about several MM articles, none of it favorable and little of it accurate. Juckes, like the rest of the Team, seldom quotes our articles – instead, he typically paraphrases what we said, often creating a straw man, which he prefers to deal with. It’s a wearisome task disentangling the many […]

Juckes and the NOAMER PC1

Subsequent to MM05 (GRL), the issue of covariance and correlation PCs as applied to the North American tree ring network was considered in Huybers [2005], our Reply to Huybers [2005] and the NAS Panel. It was also discussed in the rejected Ammann and Wahl submission to GRL. Juckes did not even cite the discussion on […]

Bristlecones, Foxtails and Temperature

The relationship of bristlecone/foxtails to gridcell temperature is something that I’ve discussed at length, but, surprisingly, I’ve never illustrated it at the blog. This is a type of relationship that, in some ways, is well suited to blogs. It’s simple to discuss; it’s important. It would be amply illustrated and discussed in business feasibility studies […]

Rocky Mountain High #2

Pat Frank thought that I was being a little sarcastic of the rigors of updating tree ring collections at Niwot Ridge. However, I’d like now to give what is perhaps a better example of what Mann had in mind when he explained the inability of paleoclimatologists to update tree ring collections. Just to review, here’s […]

Ring Widths and Temperature #1

A common theme to recent questions has been the relationship of ring width chronologies to temperatures, and, in particular, the relationship of bristlecone chronologies to temperature. Rob Wilson has recently weighed in on this. While it was nice of Rob to present some new material, people should not lose sight of the fact that the […]

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