Tag Archives: treeline

Upper and Lower Bristlecone Sites

A while ago, I discussed the very interesting study by Naurzbaev et al [2004] (co-author Hughes), which calculated growth curves at 34 larch sites in a meridional transect from 55 to 72 N (at a longitude of about 90-100E) and 23 larch sites along an altitudinal transect from 1120 to 2350 m around Tuva (~ […]

Naurzbaev

Naurzbaev et al [2004] is a terrific article by Naurzbaev, Hughes (yes, that Hughes) and Vaganov about deducing climate information from tree-ring growth curves in Siberia. (I find Naurzbaev’s work consistently interesting.) They studied 34 larch sites in a meridional transect from 55 to 72 N (at a longitude of about 90-100E) and 23 larch […]

Lamarche on Treelines #2

Here is Lamarche’s diagram of altitudes at the key bristlecone sites of Sheep Mountain and Campito Mountain (as noted below, when wood erosion is allosed for, the post-MWP decline is placed after 1500.)

Lamarche [1973] on Treelines #1

Valmore Lamarche was perhaps the first person to suggest that temperature information could be extracted from bristlecone pine information and his early publications are often referenced. Lamarche et al. [1984] (with Fritts, Graybill and Rose) first postulated CO2 fertilization. As you know, I’m increasingly interested in changes in treeline elevation as a "low-frequency proxy". It […]

Medieval #6: Whitewing Mt, California

Miller et al. [2004] studied fossil evidence of forest levels in 9 locations in the western U.S. over the past 3500 years, including Whitewing Mountain and San Joaquin Ridge, Inyo Craters Chain in the eastern Sierra Nevadas, near the bristlecones of the White Mountains (about which I’m going to post an interesting graphic on their […]

Polar Urals: Shiyatov’s Finnish Academy Article

I’ve written on a number of occasions on Briffa’s Polar Urals reconstruction, which is used in nearly every multiproxy reconstruction, no doubt because of its uniquely cold MWP. It’s one of the key series in Crowley and Lowery [2000] and Jones et al [1998]; it’s not as important in MBH98-99 (which is more or less […]

Bristlecone/Foxtail #2: Bighorn Plateau

Here’s a beautiful picture of a foxtail pine from the MWP, illustrating eloquently the change in treelines: Original Caption: A dead trunk above current treeline from a foxtail pine that lived about 1000 years ago near Bighorn Plateau in Sequoia National Park.

Altitude at Briffa’s Polar Urals

The Polar Urals tree ring site is another staple of multiproxy studies, being used in Bradley and Jones [1993], Hughes and Diaz[1994], Overpeck et al. [1997], Jones et al. [1998], MBH98, MBH99, Crowley and Lowery [2000], Esper et al. [2002], Bradley, Hughes and Diaz [2003] and Rutherford et al. [2005] (which recycles MBH98). In fact, […]

Medieval #3: Wassuk Range, California

Millar, Constance, Robert Westfall, Diane Delany, John King and Harry Alden, Climate As An Ecosystem Architect; Responses Of High-Elevation Conifers To Past Climate Variability.

Huldén, Lena, 2001. Terra 113, 171-8. Oak barrels and the medieval warm period in Satakunta [Finland] (Finnish) .

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