Search Results for: parameterization

Cloud Super-Parameterization and Low Climate Sensitivity

“Superparameterization” is described by the Climate Process Team on Low-Latitude Cloud Feedbacks on Climate Sensitivity in an online meeting report (Bretherton, 2006) as: a recently developed form of global modeling in which the parameterized moist physics in each grid column of an AGCM is replaced by a small cloud-resolving model (CRM). It holds the promise […]

Gregory et al 2019: Unsound claims about bias in climate feedback and climate sensitivity estimation

A guest post by Nic Lewis The recently published open-access paper “How accurately can the climate sensitivity to CO2 be estimated from historical climate change?” by Gregory et al.[i] makes a number of assertions, many uncontentious but others in my view unjustified, misleading or definitely incorrect. Perhaps most importantly, they say in the Abstract that […]

Emergent constraints on climate sensitivity in global climate models, Part 3

The two strongest potentially credible constraints, and conclusions A guest post by Nic Lewis In Part 1 of this article the nature and validity of emergent constraints[1] on equilibrium climate sensitivity (ECS) in GCMs were discussed, drawing mainly on the analysis and assessment of 19 such constraints in Caldwell et al. (2018),[2] who concluded that […]

Emergent constraints on climate sensitivity in global climate models, Part 2

The four constraints that Caldwell assessed as credible A guest post by Nic Lewis In Part 1 of this article the nature and validity of emergent constraints[i] on equilibrium climate sensitivity (ECS) in GCMs were discussed, drawing mainly on the analysis and assessment of 19 such constraints in Caldwell et al (2018; henceforth Caldwell),[ii] who […]

Reply to Patrick Brown’s response to my article commenting on his Nature paper

Introduction I thank Patrick Brown for his detailed response (also here) to statistical issues that I raised in my critique “Brown and Caldeira: A closer look shows global warming will not be greater than we thought” of his and Ken Caldeira’s recent paper (BC17).[1] The provision of more detailed information than was given in BC17, and […]

New Paper by McKitrick and Vogelsang comparing models and observations in the tropical troposphere

This is a guest post by Ross McKitrick. Tim Vogelsang and I have a new paper comparing climate models and observations over a 55-year span (1958-2012) in the tropical troposphere. Among other things we show that climate models are inconsistent with the HadAT, RICH and RAOBCORE weather balloon series. In a nutshell, the models not only […]

Guy Callendar vs the GCMs

As many readers have already surmised, the “GCM-Q” model that visually out-performed the Met Office CMIP5 contribution (HadGEM2) originated with Guy Callendar, and, in particular, Callendar 1938 (QJRMS). My attention was drawn to Callendar 1938 by occasional CA reader Phil Jones (see here and cover blog post by co-author Ed Hawkins here.) See postscript for […]

Lindzen’s PNAS Reviews

Chip Knappenberg has published Lindzen’s review correspondence with PNAS at Rob Bradley’s blog here. Most CA readers will be interested in this and I urge you to read the post, taking care to consult the attachments. (I would have preferred that the post include some excerpts from the attachments.) The post focuses to a considerable […]

Curry Reviews Lindzen and Choi

As per a request initiated by Bender, here is a critique of the recent Lindzen and Choi paper. Citation: Lindzen, R. S., and Y.-S. Choi (2009), On the determination of climate feedbacks from ERBE data, Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L16705, doi:10.1029/ 2009GL039628. http://www.seas.harvard.edu/climate/seminars/pdfs/lindzen.choi.grl.2009.pdf Abstract: Climate feedbacks are estimated from fluctuations in the outgoing radiation budget […]

Erice 2009 – A Quick Synopsis

This year’s Erice International Seminar was the 42nd. All recipients received an interesting book of memoirs of the seminars (edited W. Barletta and H. Wegener) from which I’ve scanned two interesting pictures (the pictures in the book were mostly recovered by Bill Barletta, an MIT physicist). The first shows Paul Dirac on the right talking […]